Project Updates

A graphic of a puppy telling people to visit recode.la
Zoning isn’t exactly the hottest buzzword these days, but it does have a major influence on the City of Los Angeles as we know and love it today. Thankfully, these adorable animals are here to help us express why LA is in such desperate need of a new Zoning Code.     The Zoning Code was last updated in 1946. Impressive, right?   Since then, not only has it grown to over 600 pages ...   ... but...
A graphic from at 1938 City Planning Commission report depicting the Zoning Status throughout Los Angeles.
A guest contribution by Dr. Andrew Whittemore Los Angeles’ current Zoning Code largely represents the efforts of homeowners’ groups, in the decades after World War II, to protect a concept of good zoning espoused by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA). This concept of good zoning, which encourages the rigid separation of uses and low densities, is of merit in some situations, but certainly...
recode LA in place of the Hollywood sign
    Keep using the 1946 Zoning Code!? Ain't nobody got time for that!           As you may or may not know, the City of Los Angeles has started a 5-year project to modernize its Zoning Code. We know this news probably has most of you feeling like... via timeout.com   But re:code LA is actually a super exciting project. via estrelalalala.tumblr.com   You see, right now, people have a hard time...
HAPPY 68TH BIRTHDAY, LA ZONING CODE!!!   Sixty-eight years ago this weekend (June 1st, 1946), Los Angeles officially adopted its Zoning Code. At the time, LA’s Code was quite the little starlet—at least in the planning world—as it was the first unified code to be adopted by a large American city. Flash forward nearly seventy years, and that star has aged significantly.    Until now, we in the...
View of Los Angeles and the Observatory, March 2017
Share your experiences of life in Los Angeles as it relates to topics covered in the Zoning Code Evaluation Report.   Explore this week’s theme: Housing Affordability & Diversity   A City to Call Home Let’s be frank: the right kind of housing in Los Angeles can be expensive and hard to find where you need it. In some places, a vacant one-bedroom unit in a duplex for $1400 per month is...